Get It

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while you may remember when I partnered with my friend Mike to do a series of Adventure Races in the summer of 2011 after I quit my soul sucking corporate job. He gave me the opportunity to experience these amazing races first hand. It was an adventure, to say the least. I’ve since been bouncing—I never really stop moving around, as you all know.

            Well. Now many of my friends and family are wondering WHY I’ve landed in the middle of nowhere Maryland. Mike is putting a on a race of his own and has asked for my help in coordinating, marking, creating, marketing and building this thing (so click HERE and like our page on facebook) I love this end of races. In Oregon I worked on Granite-Man but an AR is a whole new beast to tackle, especially because this is our first year.

In the mean time, while not planning check points, getting sponsors and talking up the race to the community I will be waiting tables at the Black Bear Tavern (a post on my first day, coming soon) riding bikes, paddling in the lake and training for my own races all while exploring this beautifully untouched part of Maryland. Don’t let The Wire fool you, there is more to this state than drug deals and murder.

 

It’s time to be busy, be happy, enjoy my surroundings and experience everything.

 

Morning bike ride

Morning bike ride

Work shirt. The customers are...colorful

Work shirt. The customers are…colorful

 

Yeeeeehaw Parte Dos (because sometimes I speak Spanish)

I run. In the woods I feel like an animal. My kind of trail running isn’t a path with woods on either side, it isn’t a paved bike lane along some river—my kind of trail run is a narrow path that forces me to engage both my feet and my mind; and in turn my heart and my soul are engaged just as much.

West Virginia is known for some epic trails, hiking and mountain biking—from our camp site there was a small trail that was meant for a walk or a hike, measuring, according to the sign, 1.1 miles—not far at all. But if you remember, I’ve been out for 12ish weeks and any kind of run was going to satisfy my itch to ‘float’ over rock and root. I set out to run, I ended up running, walking and absorbing the woods for all they had to offer.

Imagine a field full of tents, music blasting from across the field and then enter the woods and there is literally a line you can cross that shuts all that off. Your senses shift and change as you approach a bridge that lets you cross a stream. You walk over  the wooden bridge and it’s like someone hit the ‘mute’ button on reality and turned the volume up on a nature—this is exactly what happened. The only sounds after I crossed the bridge were chipmunks leaping out of the way, a few birds and my labored breathing. The 1.1 mile loop had an ‘approach’ and the real loop was .8 miles—short but tough. Hills, mud that made me slip up and down hill, roots, branches and logs to leap over…this was the trail running you see in a The North Face advertisement. I vow to never stop exploring and press on through the loop 1, 2, 3, 4 times. Solid.

For the first time I was wearing a pair of shoes that are considered ‘barefoot’ for their intended purpose on the trail. I’d never worn them in the woods, these shoes connected me, forced me to feel the earth under my feet and allowed it to radiate up my body and pulse through my blood. As I finished my run I had nothing but a grin on my face and sweat dripping all over my body, (WV is hot and humid when it wants to be.) I emerged from the woods to see my new friends grinning back, Alan, Lauren, Josh, Adam and Steve—they could sense the joy I was feeling and were rearranging their cars, ready to go hike and climb and inviting me to do the same. Even if there had been time for a shower there wasn’t one available; this was the beginning of my showerless week. I washed my face, threw on some yoga pants and joined them to explore WV some more.

 

Yeeehaww!!